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Yet another Government report confirms workload and pay the main reasons teachers are leaving profession

March 20, 2022

A new Government report has found that there are two main concerns why NSW teachers are considering leaving the profession – overwhelming workloads and uncompetitive salaries.

As reported in The Sunday Telegraph, the Australian Teacher Workforce Data: National Teacher Workforce Characteristics Report – NSW 2021 provides a stark picture of the teacher shortage crisis in NSW and why people are avoiding a career in teaching. Key findings include:

  • 75 per cent of teachers say the workload is too high.
  • 64 per cent say the job is too stressful and impacting on their mental health.
  • 53 per cent of full-time teachers in NSW worked 60 hours or more a week. Principals worked 63.8 hours on average.
  • 44 per cent of early career teachers said insufficient pay was the main motivation for leaving.
  • Between 23 per cent and 52 per cent of early career secondary teachers received no tertiary study in the areas they are teaching.

NSW Teachers Federation Angelo Gavrielatos said the report just reconfirms what the union, the NSW Government and the Federal Government already know - that the two of the biggest factors leading to teacher shortages are uncompetitive wages and unsustainable workloads.

“It is hard to believe that this is the first-ever official report into the working conditions for teachers in NSW. This report has been a long time coming. It has taken the Federal Government nearly five years to produce it.

“The findings are pretty damning. It lays bare the crippling hours teachers have to work every week, and it explains very clearly the main reasons why teachers don’t want to stay in the profession - unsustainable workloads and uncompetitive salaries.

“Over the past two years, we’ve had Government report after Government report, we've had inquiry after inquiry. It seems like every month, a new report is released that states that unless we lift salaries and addressed crippling workloads, we won’t be able to attract people to the teaching profession in the future,” said Mr Gavrielatos.

“Well, guess what? Instead of acting on this information, Governments have repeatedly turned a blind eye to multiple findings and refused to act on the facts.

“The only way to stop the shortages and recruit the teachers we need is to invest in teachers through more competitive salaries and manageable workloads,” he said.

“Governments know the cause and therefore, by definition, the solution to the teacher shortage. It is as plain as the numerous reports sitting on their desks,” he said.

The data in the Australian Teacher Workforce Data: National Teacher Workforce Characteristics Report – NSW 2021 was drawn from 2018 teacher registration data from the NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA), the State’s teacher regulatory authority.

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Authorised by Maxine Sharkey, General Secretary, NSW Teachers Federation, 23-33 Mary St. Surry Hills NSW 2010

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© New South Wales Teachers Federation. All Rights Reserved.

Authorised by Maxine Sharkey, General Secretary, NSW Teachers Federation, 23-33 Mary St. Surry Hills NSW 2010

Privacy Policy