Corkscrew: wine reviews

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Corkscrew: wine reviews

February 18, 2019

As we enter 2019, the vintage is getting underway in some parts of the country. It appears to be getting earlier and earlier due to climate change, in some areas by two to three weeks.

That said, people I have spoken to say the Australian vintage is set to be a good vintage due to yields that are up in many areas while average in others. The final result will not be known until the vintage is finished, in some parts around mid to late April.

While China, the United Kingdom and United States are still the three major wine markets, there will be lots of wine to go around on the domestic side. I buy much of my wine online. I also like to pick up some wines I review and look out for them in selected bottle shops near where I live in the Sutherland shire. It’s always good to shop around; it does pay, I can assure you.

Let’s start off the year with the 2016 Berton Vineyard Gundagai Shiraz. Bright ruby red in colour with a lovely pink rim entices you to drink. The fruit on the nose is perfumed scents of black fruits, such as black cherries, blackcurrant and blueberries with cinnamon and French oak seeping through on the nose. The palate is fruit driven and really resonates with those same aromas found on the nose. This full-bodied wine finishes dry with balanced acid/oak tannins and lingering fruit aplenty. It’s a stunner of a wine for the price. (rrp $20)

The Mudgee-based 2017 Huntington Estate Barrel Fermented Chardonnay is one to look out for should you like a buttery mouth-feel. A light straw yellow in colour with a green tinge around the rim, the nose offers ripe citrus and mandarin and rockmelon flavours. This wine has been matured on lees (yeasts) for eight months in seasoned oak, giving it a lovely buttery, yeasty, creamy mouth-feel. The citrus fruit comes through as does the acidity. This wine is a complex dry style of chardonnay that should delight those of you that like the complex buttery chardonnays of yesteryear. (rrp $24)

The 2017 Angullong Fossil Hill Riesling from this Orange-based winery is up there when it comes to cool/cold climate rieslings. This one shows a green straw colour indicating its youth. The nose offers fragrant orange blossom, apricots and grapefruit. The mouth-watering acidity on the palate was a real drawcard for me with lemon/limes and grapefruit coming to the fore. The finish is minerally, dry and crisp with balanced acidity. It’s my style of wine. (rrp $24)

The 2016 Hastwell and Lightfoot Sands of Time McLaren Vale Shiraz comes from the very best of what Mark Hastwell and Martin Lightfoot have to offer. The vines are grown on American rootstocks; they are the only winery in this region to do so. The wine displays a deep purple colour with an inviting pink hue around the rim. The nose is rich and complex with a mixture of red/black fruits. The palate is rich and complex with myriad fruits – redcurrant and spicy blackcurrant, plum and a little black pepper. The oak is nicely intertwined, as are the tannins and acidity. The finish is a wine of note with balance, richness and complexity.(rrp $30)

Jip Jip Rocks 2018 Sauvignon Blanc is straw coloured with a bright green hue around the rim of the glass. The nose is grassy and herbaceous with lots of tropical fruit flavours on display. The fruit on the palate shows mango, guava, lemon and limes combined with racy, mouth-watering acidity in the mix. The finish is dry with that acidy dominating. A lively style of sauvignon blanc and something different coming from the Padthaway region of South Australia. (rrp $21)

Stablemate, the Jip Jip Rocks 2017 Pinot Noir comes from the Adelaide Hills. See-through cherry-red in colour with a bright pink hue around the rim of the glass, the nose displays raspberry and strawberry notes with a whiff of dark spice adding to the allure. The palate is soft and fruity combined with a mixture of red/black berry fruits. The spice is also appealing with the acid/oak tannins adding body and structure to this light-bodied wine. The finish is dry with some complexity to boot. (rrp $24)

The 2018 Robert Stein Farm Series Mudgee Rosé is a light bright red in colour, the nose gives way to aromatic ripe fruit such as black cherries, blackcurrant and mulberry. Surprisingly, on the palate the fruit has flesh with a ripe dry texture and is somewhat complex for this style. The same flavours found on the nose come cascading down onto the palate, which is as fresh as a daisy, light on tannins and packed with flavour. The acidity adds to the allure of this style. Excellent. (rrp $18)

2016 Morambro Creek The Bryson. This shiraz/cabernet sits at the very top of what the Bryson family has to offer. This family-owned and operated winery is situated in the Padthaway region of South Australia and was established in 1994. Deep inky purple in colour, the wine has a pink hue giving it eye appeal. The nose is rich and complex, cigar-like with lashings of dark fruits jumping out of the glass. The French oak is prevalent but plays a supporting and not dominating role. On the palate, you will find blackcurrant, redcurrant, olive, spice and much more with the oak adding complexity and depth to the wine while the tannins are firm and balanced by the acids. The wine has immense structure, depth and flavour that is long lasting. It’s a serious wine at a serious price. (rrp $55)

Jim McMahon teaches hospitality at Sutherland TAFE

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© New South Wales Teachers Federation. All Rights Reserved.

Authorised by John Dixon, General Secretary
NSW Teachers Federation
23-33 Mary St. Surry Hills NSW 2010

Privacy Policy