Corkscrew: wine reviews

  • Home /
  • Corkscrew: wine reviews

Corkscrew: wine reviews

December 05, 2019

Light green and pale lemon in colour, the nose of Trentham Estate NV The Family Prosecco offers ripe white pear and other tropical fruit aromas. The wine displays a fine bead, which quickly dissipates once poured. It’s a refreshing, easy-drinking style with medium amounts of acidity. The wine is light to medium-bodied with those same aromas found on the nose also coming to the fore on the palate. The wine has a garden freshness about it on the palate with ripe fruit flavours dominating. (rrp $18)

From the same stable comes the 2019 Trentham Estate Vermentino. This grape variety originally hails from Spain and is grown in many coastal Mediterranean countries but found a home on the Island of Sardinia and now at Meriben in Victoria. Pale lemon in colour with a vibrant green rim, the aromatics most certainly stand out. Lovely pear, lemon/limes delight on the nose and really do express themselves well. The soft mouth-watering acidity gets you first time round and really draws you in. The wine also has a delicate talc-type texture; citrus and grapefruit flavours abound and run back and forth across the palate. It’s a delightful, soft, light to medium-bodied wine with balanced acidity on a soft, dry finish. (rrp $18)

2017 Angullong Shiraz. This cool climate shiraz from Orange exhibits a deep purple colour with bright crimson hues. The nose displays white peppery spice with lots of dark, ripe berry fruit. The blackberry fruit combined with dark black plummy flavours take centre stage. The ripeness and smoothness of the wine on the palate is enticing. A nicely balanced shiraz with the other components such as acid/tannin and oak flavours all coming together as one. This full-bodied wine over-delivers. (rrp $22)

Morambro Creek Padthaway (SA) 2016 Shiraz. With a lineage going back to 1851, the Bryson family has been toiling on the land in this part of the world for well over a century and knows more than a thing or two about agriculture and viticulture. The wine is deep, deep purple with inviting pink hues around the rim. The intensity of the fruit on the nose is a sit-up and take note moment. Focused aromas of red/black fruits take hold on the nose. The palate is rich and complex with mulberry, red and blackcurrant flavours combined with nicely integrated oak giving this full-bodied wine a dry, lingering fruit driven finish. (rrp $35)

2017 Hastwell and Lightfoot Shiraz. The partnership of the Hastwell and Lightfoot families dates back to 1988; they have been making wine and growing grapes together on their 16 hectare property in the McLaren Vale ever since. Another interesting point about their vineyard is that it is entirely grown on American rootstocks, which are more resistant to the vine louse phylloxera. The first wine to be bottled under their joint names was 60 cases of 1990 Cabernet Sauvignon. Today they produce 5000 cases of wine. The 2017 Shiraz shows a vibrant purple colour with a bright pink rim indicating youth. The nose is awash with mulberry and raspberry notes with the oak adding a whiff of vanilla. The palate is fruit driven with firm tannins and intense varietal fruit flavours such as black cherry, raspberry, stewed plums with black olive and hints of licorice. The finish is intense with this full-bodied wine displaying a firm acid/tannin/oak balance. (rrp $25)

Another product of this partnership is the 2016 Hastwell and Lightfoot Cabernet Sauvignon, deep red/purple in colour with a lovely light purple/pink hue around the rim. Rhubarb, blackcurrant, plum and clove flavours take hold on the nose. The fruit on the palate shows myriad wild berries with hints of chocolate and coffee flavours. The oak, acid and tannin profile is in harmony with the wine. The finish is full-bodied and dry with good palate weight and length. (rrp $25)

Berton Vineyard Winemakers Reserve 2019 Aranel. This obscure white grape variety hails from Bordeaux, France, where it is quite rare and usually made as a white blend. I can think of no other Australian producers of this white grape variety, but it’s great to taste something different. Green straw in colour, the nose gives way to aromatics such as white pear and citrus notes. The palate is soft and fruity with fresh grapefruit flavours and mouth-watering acidity. The wine has palate length with a crisp, acid dry finish. (rrp $14)

Berton Vineyard Metal Label 2019 Viognier. Light green pale lemon in colour, the nose is very aromatic with lemon and lime together with blond tobacco flavours showing through. The mouth- watering crisp acidity on the palate is quite noticeable as are the citrus and white peach flavours. The wine is an easy drinking style with a long, clean, crisp, dry acid finish. A lovely wine if I may say so! (rrp $12)

This is my last wine column for Education after 25 years of penning “Corkscrew” — it’s time to put the pen or keyboard to one side and take some time out as I pursue fresh opportunities. I reckon I have written around 250,000 vinous words writing this column. I have also reviewed around 3800 wines and have enjoyed every minute and every adventure throughout Australia and around the world. Thank you to the four editors past and present who have given me the opportunity to contribute to Education.

Jim McMahon teaches hospitality at Sutherland TAFE

Editor’s note: Education thanks Jim for his commitment to the column over 25 years

logo

About Us

The New South Wales Teachers Federation is the registered trade union which covers NSW public school teachers. Read more

© New South Wales Teachers Federation. All Rights Reserved.

Authorised by John Dixon, General Secretary, NSW Teachers Federation, 23-33 Mary St. Surry Hills NSW 2010

Privacy Policy

© New South Wales Teachers Federation. All Rights Reserved.

Authorised by John Dixon, General Secretary, NSW Teachers Federation, 23-33 Mary St. Surry Hills NSW 2010

Privacy Policy